The US says it’s ending El Salvador’s TPS status. Let’s play a game of good slant / bad slant.
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The US says it’s ending El Salvador’s TPS status. Let’s play a game of good slant / bad slant.

January 9, 2018

The Raw Data

Unspun and unbiased. These are the facts.

US to end temporary protected status for El Salvador in 2019

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced Monday it will terminate El Salvador’s Temporary Protected Status (TPS) on Sept. 9, 2019. The DHS indicated Salvadorans could in the interim leave the U.S. or “seek an alternative lawful immigration status” in the country, if eligible.

Read the full Raw Data here.

Distortion Highlights

  • Approximately 200,000 lives may be directly affected by the U.S.’ decision to terminate El Salvador’s Temporary Protected Status designation.
  • Like all decisions, this will likely carry positive and negative consequences. But the media outlets we analyzed suggested it would only play out one way or another.
  • What’s more, they did it with spin, implication and oversimplification. Is that the best way to tackle a problem?

Show Me Everything

The Distortion

The Knife’s analysis of how news outlets distort information. (This section may contain opinion.)

Top Spin Words

  • Wrenching

    After that, they no longer will have permission to stay in the country, forcing them into a wrenching decision. (The New York Times)

  • Enormous strain

    If all TPS holders return or are deported, it will impose an enormous strain on a country of 6.2 million people where poverty is widespread and gang violence remains a serious problem. (The Washington Post)

  • Destabilizing wave

    The Trump administration’s decision to eliminate residency permits for some 200,000 Salvadoran migrants could cause far-reaching disruptions in the small Central American country, including a steep decline in remittances from abroad and a destabilizing wave of returning citizens to a homeland still racked by violence, according to immigration experts and Salvadoran officials. (The Washington Post)

  • Crippled

    Omar Salinas has Temporary Protected Status, which is granted to U.S. immigrants from countries crippled by disaster or war. (The New York Times)

  • Brutal

    For years, El Salvador has been racked by brutal gang violence, including from the MS-13 gang that has gained a significant presence in the U.S. (LA Times)

  • Cheap-labor

    In Kansas, almost 29 percent of zip codes had fewer jobs and businesses in 2015 compared to 2000, which was a two-decade period of massive cheap-labor immigration. (Breitbart)

  • Troubled

    Many Salvadoran U.S. residents face deportation to their troubled homeland under the U.S. decision announced Monday to end the Temporary Protected Status program. (The Washington Post)

  • Widespread

    In 2016, the final time, the government cited several factors, including drought, poverty and widespread gang violence in El Salvador, as reasons to keep the protections in place. (The New York Times)

  • Political trouble

    The administration’s decision could also mean political trouble for President Salvador Sánchez Cerén, a former guerrilla commander during El Salvador’s civil war who has been in office since 2014. (The Washington Post)

  • Dire

    Immigrant advocates and the El Salvadoran government had pleaded for the United States to extend the program, as it has several times since 2001, saying that conditions in El Salvador were still dire. (The New York Times)

Soon after the Department of Homeland Security announced its decision to terminate El Salvador’s Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation, news outlets published one-sided articles, suggesting the effects would either be largely problematic or largely beneficial. As you might guess, outlets like The Washington Post suggested it’d be bad and outlets like Breitbart suggested it’d be good. The thing is, they didn’t do it strictly with data. Let’s play two rounds of “Good slant / bad slant” to show you what we mean.

Round 1: The negative slant. It’s not the same to say this…

The Trump administration’s decision to eliminate residency permits for some 200,000 Salvadoran migrants could cause far-reaching disruptions in the small Central American country, including a steep decline in remittances from abroad and a destabilizing wave of returning citizens to a homeland still racked by violence, according to immigration experts and Salvadoran officials. (The Washington Post)

…as it is to say this…

As many as 200,000 Salvadorans currently residing in the U.S. could return to their country, which would decrease its more than $4.5 billion in remittances annually that make up about 17 percent of El Salvador’s GDP, according to the World Bank. El Salvador has some of the highest murder rates in the world, with one estimate ranking it in second place with 64.2 murders per 100,000 population annually.

What’s the difference?

Spin. In other words, the Post uses subjective, emotional and vague language to describe problems that could come from the decision. Here, spin shapes our impression of the problem, but it’s anyone’s guess how “steep” the decrease in remittances might be, or how “racked” El Salvador is by violence. As for the “far-reaching disruptions,” the spin is so vague there that we’re not really sure what to do with it.

Saying it with data gives us something measurable, something we can all understand to begin debating the issues.

Round 2: The positive slant. It’s not the same to say this…

The cheap-labor policy has also reduced investment and job creation in many interior states because the coastal cities have a surplus of imported labor. For example, almost 27 percent of zip codes in Missouri had fewer jobs or businesses in 2015 than in 2000, according to a new report by the Economic Innovation Group. In Kansas, almost 29 percent of zip codes had fewer jobs and businesses in 2015 compared to 2000, which was a two-decade period of massive cheap-labor immigration. (Breitbart)

…as it is to say… Wait a minute!

How exactly do the above statistics relate to what Breitbart calls “the cheap-labor policy” or the “Washington-imposed economic policy of mass-immigration”? That’s right, those terms in red are also spin.

What’s the difference?

Implication, oversimplification and possibly faulty reasoning. In other words, Breitbart cites various economic and labor statistics to suggest immigrants are to blame for the country’s economic problems (and apparently other problems as well). In the example above, the outlet implies immigrant labor caused investment and job creation to be reduced in “many” interior states. Were no other factors involved at all? Surely it can’t be that simple. (Economics rarely is!)

The truth of the matter is, assuming this TPS decision moves forward without measures by Congress or decisions from the judiciary branch (which, by the way, was a perspective none of the outlets we analyzed explored), there will likely be upsides and downsides. Having data to examine what those effects may be is not only useful, but necessary.

As readers, we can’t work with a problem efficiently if things like spin, implication and oversimplifications are in the way. That’s like the difference between a doctor giving you a precise diagnosis or telling you you’re in “really bad shape.”

The government’s decision on El Salvador’s TPS designation may indeed present a number of problems, so let’s get the data first and work from there.

Is it fact or fiction? Which outlet presents the most spin?

  • 43% Spun

  • 50% Spun

  • 52% Spun

  • 59% Spun

Fiction
or
Fact

Breitbart

“[Immigration] also drives up real estate prices, widens wealth-gaps, reduces high-tech investment, increases state and local tax burdens, hurts kids’ schools and college education, pushes Americans away from high-tech careers, and sidelines at least 5 million marginalized Americans and their families, including many who are now struggling with opioid addictions.”

Immigration has positive and negative effects on a country’s economy. Some individuals in the U.S. have opioid addiction.

The Numbers

See how the articles rate in spin, slant and logic when held against objective standards.

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